Differential calculus using Sagemath

Granville’s classic text book Elements of the Differential and Integral Calculus fell into the public domain and then much of it (but not all, at the time of this writing) was scanned into wikisource primarily by R. J. Hall. Granville’s entire book contains material on differential, integral, and even multivariable calculus. The material in the subset here is restricted to differential calculus topics, though contains some material which might properly belong to an elementary differential geometry course. The above-mentioned wikisource document uses mathml and latex and some Greek letter fonts.

In particular, the existence of this document owes itself primarily to three great open source projects: TeX/LaTeX, Wikipedia, and Sagemath (http://www.sagemath.org). Some material from Sean Mauch’s public domain text on Applied Mathematics, was also included.

The current latex document is due to David Joyner, who is responsible for re-formatting, editing for readability, the correction (or introduction) of typos from the scanned version, and any extra material added (for example, the hyperlinked cross references, and the Sagemath material). Please email corrections to wdjoyner@gmail.com.

Though the original text of Granville is public domain, the extra material added in this version is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License (please see the FDL) as is most of Wikipedia.

Acknowledgements: I thank the following readers for reporting typos: Mario Pernici, Jacob Hicks.

Now available from amazon.com for $20 (not including shipping).

Discrete Fourier transforms using Sagemath

Here are some Sagemath examples for DFTs, DCTs, and DST’s. You can try copying and pasting them into the Sagemath cloud, for example.

The Sagemath dft command applies to a sequence S indexed by a set J computes the un-normalized DFT: (in Python)

[sum([S[i]*chi(zeta**(i*j)) for i in J]) for j in J]Here are some examples which explain the syntax:

sage: J = range(6)
sage: A = [ZZ(1) for i in J]
sage: s = IndexedSequence(A,J)
sage: s.dft(lambda x:x^2)
   Indexed sequence: [6, 0, 0, 6, 0, 0]
   indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
sage: s.dft()
   Indexed sequence: [6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
   indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
sage: G = SymmetricGroup(3)
sage: J = G.conjugacy_classes_representatives()
sage: s = IndexedSequence([1,2,3],J) # 1,2,3 are the values of a class fcn on G
sage: s.dft()   # the "scalar-valued Fourier transform" of this class fcn
    Indexed sequence: [8, 2, 2]
    indexed by [(), (1,2), (1,2,3)]
sage: J = AbelianGroup(2,[2,3],names='ab')
sage: s = IndexedSequence([1,2,3,4,5,6],J)
sage: s.dft()   # the precision of output is somewhat random and arch. dependent.
    Indexed sequence: [21.0000000000000, -2.99999999999997 - 1.73205080756885*I, -2.99999999999999 + 1.73205080756888*I, -9.00000000000000 + 0.0000000000000485744257349999*I, -0.00000000000000976996261670137 - 0.0000000000000159872115546022*I, -0.00000000000000621724893790087 - 0.0000000000000106581410364015*I]                
     indexed by Multiplicative Abelian Group isomorphic to C2 x C3
sage: J = CyclicPermutationGroup(6)
sage: s = IndexedSequence([1,2,3,4,5,6],J)
sage: s.dft()   # the precision of output is somewhat random and arch. dependent.
    Indexed sequence: [21.0000000000000, -2.99999999999997 - 1.73205080756885*I, -2.99999999999999 + 1.73205080756888*I, -9.00000000000000 + 0.0000000000000485744257349999*I, -0.00000000000000976996261670137 - 0.0000000000000159872115546022*I, -0.00000000000000621724893790087 - 0.0000000000000106581410364015*I]
     indexed by Cyclic group of order 6 as a permutation group
sage: p = 7; J = range(p); A = [kronecker_symbol(j,p) for j in J]
age: s = IndexedSequence(A,J)
sage: Fs = s.dft()
sage: c = Fs.list()[1]; [x/c for x in Fs.list()]; s.list()
     [0, 1, 1, -1, 1, -1, -1]
     [0, 1, 1, -1, 1, -1, -1]

 

The DFT of the values of the quadratic residue symbol is itself, up to a constant factor (denoted c on the last line above).

Here is a 2nd example:

sage: J = range(5)
sage: A = [ZZ(1) for i in J]
sage: s = IndexedSequence(A,J)
sage: fs = s.dft(); fs
  Indexed sequence: [5, 0, 0, 0, 0]
   indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
sage: it = fs.idft(); it
  Indexed sequence: [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
   indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
age: it == s
True
sage: t = IndexedSequence(B,J)
sage: s.convolution(t)
 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]

Here is a 3rd example:

sage: J = range(5)
sage: A = [exp(-2*pi*i*I/5) for i in J]
sage: s = IndexedSequence(A,J)
sage: s.dct()    # discrete cosine
   Indexed sequence: [2.50000000000011 + 0.00000000000000582867087928207*I, 2.50000000000011 + 0.00000000000000582867087928207*I, 2.50000000000011 + 0.00000000000000582867087928207*I, 2.50000000000011 + 0.00000000000000582867087928207*I, 2.50000000000011 + 0.00000000000000582867087928207*I]
    indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
sage: s.dst()        # discrete sine
  Indexed sequence: [0.0000000000000171529457304586 - 2.49999999999915*I, 0.0000000000000171529457304586 - 2.49999999999915*I, 0.0000000000000171529457304586 - 2.49999999999915*I, 0.0000000000000171529457304586 - 2.49999999999915*I, 0.0000000000000171529457304586 - 2.49999999999915*I]
   indexed by [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

Here is a 4th example:

sage: I = range(3)
sage: A = [ZZ(i^2)+1 for i in I]
sage: s = IndexedSequence(A,I)
sage: P1 = s.plot()
sage: P2 = s.plot_histogram()

P1 and P2 are displayed below:

The plots of P1

The plot of P1

The plot of P2

The plot of P2